Are you a Guerrilla Marketer?

15 years ago the strength of our economy was driven by small businesses and it was at that time that I first read the book Guerrilla Marketing. This revolutionary book highlighted the need for small organizations to take a different approach, highlighting their nimbleness, rapid decision making and thirst to succeed. The premise of Guerrilla Marketing was simple, to create a marketing strategy that took advantage of every opportunity, was relentless in the pursuit of opportunity and understood the symbiotic relationship between marketing tools. In other words, Guerrilla Marketing created an environment in which every employee pursued a common mission, every marketing process operated in harmony and the organization was firing on all cylinders.

15 years later, our economy is still driven by small business and although marketing tools have dramatically changed, the premise and concept of Guerrilla Marketing remains sound and effective. But in today’s world of increasing communication tools and strategies (social media, email, PPC advertising campaigns, and traditional media) the heart of Levinson’s principles are being forgotten.

So your organization is growing…

You have a fledgling social media plan…

You have an email marketing plan…

You have an affiliate marketing plan…

You advertise on that locally popular website…

You even engage in traditional print and direct mail campaigns…

But does your marketing plan address all of these efforts as a single function?

Does your monthly/quarterly tracking deal with these efforts as a single function or as separately tracked indicators?

A colleague recently passed on an article, Hot or Not: E-mail Marketing vs. Social-Media Marketing. Although the well-written article discusses the need to leverage all media channels, the title underscores the tendency of organizations to create competing strategies with regards to their marketing arsenal.

Time and time again, I see marketing plans that want to treat every aspect of organizational marketing as separate entities. Companies are increasingly adopting marketing strategies that will target Twitter as a platform for product marketing, Facebook as a platform for client relationship building, Email Marketing as a method of soliciting further business from clients, PPC and traditional print advertising for the purpose of attracting new business and a weblog to issue company news. Each of these marketing activities will act independently, serving different functions with competing measures of success and commonly managed by different individuals. The end result is a disjointed marketing strategy that serves no primary function, cannot be effectively measured and consistently bypasses opportunity.

Today’s marketing weapons have a symbiotic relationship. In order to effectively maximize each, they must work together and their success should be measured as a whole. No organization sets out to create an ineffective marketing strategy, yet the evolution of marketing weapons and lack of cohesive messaging often leads to just that. Email Marketing, Social Media Marketing, Print Advertising, Affiliate Marketing and every other tagline should be viewed as marketing weapons that only operate well when they are utilized as part of a comprehensive, organizational marketing plan. So take a step back and ask yourself if your organization is firing on all cylinders? If not, perhaps it’s time to redefine your organizational objectives.

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